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McKenzie Method of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy

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McKenzie Method of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy

Learn how Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy® (MDT) can effectively treat low back and neck pain.

The McKenzie Method of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) is a unique method of treating spine and extremity pain. The method has been in development for over 60 years, originally created by Robin McKenzie. It is an in-depth assessment, diagnosis, and treatment process that has been well researched throughout the years. Its validity as a treatment method for musculoskeletal pain is consistently supported in the literature. It requires no surgery, medication, needles, or expensive equipment.

The research has shown the MDT assessment to be extremely reliable in identifying pain of a mechanical origin. Mechanical pain originates from a biomechanical dysfunction in the way the bones, joints, or associated muscles are moving. The vast majority of musculoskeletal pain, including neck and low back pain, falls into this category.

Per the McKenzie Institute’s website: “The treatment principles of the McKenzie Method promote the body’s potential to repair itself and do not involve the use of medication, heat, cold, ultrasound, needles, or surgery. McKenzie allows patients to learn the principles and empowers them to be in control of their own symptom management, which can reduce dependency on medical intervention.”

Here at Fox Physical Therapy, we use the MDT assessment as one of our primary methods to effectively treat low back and neck pain. During the assessment, one of our Doctors of Physical Therapy will help to determine the exact cause of your symptoms as well as implement a treatment plan to quickly resolve your symptoms. The best part of the MDT method is that it allows you, the patient, to gain control over your symptoms and keep them under control even when outside of the clinic setting.

If you have been experiencing pain or issues with your body and its performance contact us today. You may be experiencing an underlying biomechanical that needs to be addressed by one of our doctors.

Hamstring Strain Rehabilitation Tips

Hamstring Strain Rehabilitation Tips

Don’t let a hamstring strain turn into a recurring injury!

Dr. Braulio Espinosa

Chances are if you play a sport that requires repetitive kicking then you are familiar with the term hamstring strain or “pulling a hamstring”. Hamstring strains account for 12–16% of all injuries in athletes with a re-injury rate reported as high as 22–34%. Hamstring strains are a very common and nagging injury typical seen in athletes who perform high speed sprinting, repetitive kicking and explosive movements associated with acceleration and change of direction. This injury accounts for 38% and 28% of the lower extremity injuries seen in high school and college football respectively and makes up the highest percentage of total injuries in rugby. The high incidence of injury in this muscle group may be partly due to the fact that the hamstrings cross over two joints (the hip and the knee) and are therefore subject to much greater reaction forces at multiple points along the lower extremity chain. The hamstrings are a colloquial term used to describe three distinct muscles, two on the medial side (semimebranosus, semitendinosis) and one on the lateral side (biceps femoris). All three muscles are responsible for bending the knee and extending back the hip, two actions that are crucial for sprinting, jumping, and kicking. These muscles originate from the hip and turn into tendons that with two attaching to the inside of your leg bone and one attaching to the outside, crossing the knee joint. A muscle strain is a term used to describe damage or a tear to the muscle/ tendon. Like most injuries, a strain can range from a simple overstretch injury all the way to a complete tear of the muscle.

How do they happen?

What most of the literature agrees upon is that hamstring strains are typically caused by a non-contact injury secondary to forceful stretching. Building off this point; when analyzing running technique it has been shown that peak stress on the muscle occurred during a terminal swing phase of the sprint (see image), suggesting that this period may pose the greatest risk for injury. It is during this phase that the hamstrings are working to decelerate the leg while also controlling the degree to which your knee straightens. What this essentially means is that the type of contraction the hamstrings have to perform must switch extremely rapidly from slowing down the leg while it is straightening (the point of peak stress and stretch to the muscle) to then actually driving your hip back to propel you forward. Several research studies support that this rapid change from deceleration to acceleration by the hamstrings is when the muscle is most vulnerable to injury.

Severity of Strains

The severity of muscle strain injuries is generally categorized as Grade I: very mild tear of the muscle with minor strength loss, Grade II: partial tear of the muscle with mild bruising and significant strength loss that limits functional performance, and Grade III: complete tear of the muscle/tendon and severe disability with day to day activities. Complete tears like a grade III are rare, constituting about 1% of all hamstring strains. What is commonly observed with grade I and II strains is that in the middle of sprint, hurdle, jump, or kick the athlete will feel a tightness or pulling type pain in his posterior thigh that will cause him to stop physical activity.

Do not let this become a chronic issue!

The scary thing about hamstring strains is that the rate of re-injuring the muscle is very high, meaning that it can easily transition to a chronic problem if not correctly addressed. Across the board, the absolute biggest risk factor for having a hamstring strain is…. a previous hamstring strain. In fact, a study done on 500 amateur soccer players showed that a previous hamstring strain has been shown to increase the risk of a recurrence up to six times as much. The logical question is why does this happen? Since the symptoms of a grade I and grade II hamstring can be uncomfortable /annoying but tolerable during activities of daily living, the athlete often prematurely returns to activity after rest. This may lead to repeatedly unsuccessful efforts to return to sports without letting the muscle heal adequately. Thus, the muscle is not strong enough to tolerate the usual demands of sport which leads to another strain, or worse, a complete tear.

How can physical therapy help?

Risk factors shown to correlate with an initial hamstring strain are decreased hamstring flexibility, poor muscular strength/ endurance, poor core stability, lack of proper warm-up, inability to disassociate the trunk from the lower extremities, and poor lumbar posture. Our board-certified Doctors of Physical Therapy at Fox Physical Therapy will be able to identify any of these aforementioned deficits during the biomechanical evaluation. From there a plan of care will be implemented to correct the impairments quickly and efficiently. Remember the biggest risk to recurring hamstring strains is having that first hamstring strain, so even if you are not injured we can help to identify possible risk factors ensuring you stay at peak performance levels. Don’t wait until you break down to seek treatment. That’s the equivalent of letting your car break down on the side of the road before finally getting an oil change.

In the event that you do sustain a hamstring strain, physical therapy becomes of the utmost importance to guide and progress the athlete through his/her rehabilitation and prevent an acute injury from becoming chronic. Current literature supports that clinical diagnosis of a grade I/II strain by an experienced physical therapist is as reliable and valid as ultrasound and MRI, meaning that one does not necessarily have to wait to go to a doctor and then wait again to get an MRI in order to begin the rehabilitation process. In Florida, anybody can directly access their Physical Therapist without the need for referral.

New Physical Therapy Office Location Boca Raton

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Fox Physical Therapy Boca Raton

Fox Physical Therapy to Open New Office in Boca Raton, Florida May 1st, 2017

Fox Physical Therapy, Miami’s premier orthopedic and sports physical therapy center, is proud to announce that we are expanding north with the opening of our newest clinic in Boca Raton Florida on May 1. Conveniently located in the Twin Lakes Professional Center at 2900 North Military Trail, Suite 220, the new Boca Raton location will offer patients a hands-on, results-based approach to addressing a wide range of work, auto, orthopedic, and sports-related injuries or post-surgery therapy.

“I am excited to now offer our patients in Broward and Palm Beach County the same specialized and innovative physical therapy services our Miami patients have come to love,” said Owner and Licensed Physical Therapist Dr. Brett Fox PT, DPT, OCS, COMT. “We look forward to becoming a part of the fabric of this great community as we work together with patients to develop a holistic, cost-effective approach to managing their aches and pains.”

Fox Physical Therapy opened its flagship Miami facility in 2014. Along with an experienced team of therapists, he has grown it into one of the top physical therapy centers in South Florida. Fox Physical Therapy received the 2015 Patients’ Choice Award as one of the Top Physical Therapists in Miami.

Fox Physical Therapy Boca Raton will accept all major insurance carriers and offers those without insurance a self-pay rate. To book an appointment, please call 561-923-8292.

Must Read If Your Are Considering Spinal Surgery

Are You Considering Surgery for Sping Pain?

In continuation of our last blog post on medical imaging in regards to spine pain, we continue with a look at using medication or considering surgical interventions for controlling symptoms.

Read the original blog post, click here.

So, what about medication to help with spine pain?

Because low back pain can be excruciating, many doctors prescribe opioids for pain relief. These are narcotics and include common brand names such as OxyContin and Vicodin. In the U.S., narcotics are currently the most commonly prescribed drug, and more than half of these prescriptions are for the treatment of low back pain.

Before deciding to use these prescription drugs, it is important to understand that they alter the chemistry within the brain and have the potential to become highly addictive. Opioid addiction is responsible for more than 14,000 death per year. In as little as two weeks, the body may develop tolerance requiring increased doses and leading to withdrawal symptoms once the medication is removed. Research does show that using opioids for a short time can provide modest pain relief (up to 30%).

However, opioids provide minimal to no improvement in function. In other words, these drugs have not been shown to expedite return to work or improve functional outcomes. Moreover, long-term use has been associated with worsening disability and increased sensitivity to pain (hyperalgesia). This is because long-term use causes a reduction in the ability to tolerate pain naturally, which may mean the pain is experienced long after the original cause has healed. Other side effects include constipation, nausea, sedation, increased fall risk, fractures, depression, and sexual dysfunction. Therefore, if you decide to use these medications, current recommendations include using the lowest possible dose for the shortest amount of time.

One viable alternative to opioids includes anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), as several high-quality studies have shown they are just as effective if not superior to opioids in reducing pain and improving function with much less risk or potential harm. 

Considering surgery?

Here’s why you should explore all options and consider physical therapy before making your decision:

Surgery is almost always a last resort. The preoccupation and misconceptions associated with disc herniation found on imaging have led to many unnecessary surgeries, sometimes resulting in even worse outcomes, particularly when the herniation is not the true source of pain. Surgery carries inherent risks of complications, including infection, bleeding, and the possibility of permanent nerve damage. Significant complications occur in approximately 20% of patients. Depending on the type of procedure, the surgeon may have to cut through bone, muscle, fascia, or ligaments. Even with successful procedures, these structures take time to heal and can potentially cause scar tissue leading to pain and restricting motion. Muscles may shut down temporarily and motion may be limited for a period, which may lead to additional pain and stiffness since healthy discs require the motion for proper nutrition. The stiffness and muscle guarding may also cause other compensations in motor patterns in an effort to protect the spine. This can cause undue stress to other tissues, ultimately leading to further pain and dysfunction. Likely, physical therapy will be prescribed post-surgery and it will generally take some time to regain full function.

What can conservative care offer me?

For all these reasons, surgery is generally recommended as a last option after all other conservative treatments have failed. Research has shown that long-term outcomes after an appropriate bout of physical therapy are generally equivalent to, if not superior to outcomes after surgery. In most cases, low back pain can be addressed and relieved via physical therapy, as research shows that that therapy leads to greater pain relief and decreased drug consumption. In fact, many insurance companies require a course of physical therapy and other more conservative measures before authorizing funds for surgery. This is because the evidence shows that addressing the issue with physical therapy is successful most the time, saving both patients and their insurance companies money and eliminating potentially expensive and debilitating complications. In addition, trying therapy first is never a waste because in cases where surgery is ultimately required patients who have completed “prehab” (therapy prior to surgery) ultimately have better outcomes and faster recoveries.

We hope this small series of imaging, medication, and surgery has cleared up some preconceived myths about low back pain.

At Fox Physical Therapy, our board-certified Doctors of Physical Therapy specialize in mechanical diagnosis and treatment of spine symptoms. Contact us today to find out how we can help you feel better.

Do You Have Pain in Your Knee Cap? It Could be Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

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Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is Causing Major Issues for Athletes Living in Miami

Read our   physical therapy tips for overcoming knee pain caused from Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

By: Eric Alexander DPT,OCS,MDT,CSCS

If you are an active individual there is a good chance at some point in your life you have experienced knee pain. In one report, over the past 30 days, at least 1 in 5 adults in the United States have cited some form of knee pain¹. One of the more common types of knee pain is called patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This is basically an umbrella term for knee pain that occurs at and around the patella, also known as the knee cap.

The knee cap is a bone contained within a tendon that facilitates movement at the knee. The knee cap slides within a groove in the femur during flexion and extension at the knee. It is thought that pain originates when the patella begins to ‘mal-track’ through this patellar groove in the femur and causes uneven forces through the bony surfaces. The mal-tracking is commonly attributed to muscular imbalances in the hips, thigh, and lower leg. Common populations presenting with PFPS include runners, bicyclists, and young athletes. Pain can typically intensify by sports, walking, running, stair climbing, or sitting for a long time, often called the “Movie-Goers Sign.”

One research article, in particular, has demonstrated the importance of lateral hip strength in relation to knee alignment with activity². College athletes were followed over the course of an athletic season. The athletes who experienced knee and ankle injuries throughout the season all shared two things in common: a  weakness of the hip abductors and external rotators of the hip. Any weakness of these muscles during activity can allow your knee to drop-in towards the midline during motion, known as genu valgum, facilitating mal-tracking of the patella and PAIN.

The muscles in question are the gluteus medius, piriformis, and smaller external rotators of the hip. There are a few key exercises that you can add to your normal exercise routine that will help strengthen these muscles in question. These exercises include:

Side-lying Leg Raises

Hip External Rotation Clamshells

Side Planks

Three sets of fifteen reps (3×15) of the side-lying leg raises and clamshells coupled with two sets of thirty to sixty-second holds (2×30-60”) in the side plank position will target these muscles and assist in strengthening. Perform these exercises three to four times a week for six to eight weeks to allow for appropriate strength gains.

If you are experiencing knee pain or know someone who does, Fox Physical Therapy board-certified therapists deliver full biomechanical screens during the evaluation process to specifically identify which structures are at fault. Schedule you consultation today at 305-735-890 or click here.

Resources:

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Reporting Joint Pain or Stiffness, — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2006. MMWR 2008:57(17);467.
2. Leetun, DT, et al. Core Stability Measures as Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Injury in Athletes. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 926–934, 2004.

Speed up Your Recovery Time with Direct Access to Physical Therpay

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New law makes it easier for patients to seek treatment from a Physical Therapist without a referral from an MD.

Direct Access to Physical Therapy can speed up the time it takes patients to receive treatment during the vital first few weeks after an injury.

By: Dr. Alexander PT,DPT,OCS,MDT,CSCS

In the state of Florida, it is no longer necessary to see a Medical Doctor to initially prescribe treatment for Physical Therapy. This law was passed to directly benefit you, the patient, in getting speedy treatment for whatever musculoskeletal injury or dysfunction you may have. As a consumer, you can directly access Physical Therapy services for up to 30 days without a prescription. This speeds up the time it takes to get you the treatment you need during the vital first few weeks after injury.

I consistently see patients who are 6+ weeks removed from an injury before they finally get a chance to get in for therapy. When I ask them why it took so long I hear stories of three-week waits for initial appointments with the physician, followed by an additional one to two-week wait period to receive an MRI. When the patient finally returns to the physician following the MRI they have often prescribed a pill and told to try Physical Therapy. Why  would one wait this long?! This long wait cuts out on vital stages of the healing and remodeling process after an injury where Physical Therapy is key.

Your Doctor of Physical Therapy is the best-equipped health care practitioner to provide the treatment you need for a musculoskeletal injury. We specialize in ensuring a  full return to function without lingering issues. The majority of patients we see at Fox Physical Therapy start to see positive results within the first two weeks of treatment. If you have not been to Physical Therapy recently or have been left with disappointing results in the past I challenge you to give Fox Physical Therapy a try. Dr. Fox and I, Dr. Alexander, are Board-Certified Orthopedic Specialists and our passion is getting you back to the pain-free life you want as quickly as possible.

They say Health is Wealth. After working with an entire spectrum of patients ranging from the ages of two months to 106 years I couldn’t agree more. Don’t put off an injury until it becomes a chronic issue because you don’t want to deal with the hassle of waiting weeks to see an MD only to be prescribed a pill and an MRI. At Fox Physical Therapy you will receive personalized treatment that directly addresses the root cause of the problem.

To take advantage of Direct Access give us a call today. We will set up an initial evaluation and figure out exactly what is causing your pain. If you have a Primary Care Physician or favorite MD that you are concerned about being left out of your treatment, worry not. You provide us the name and we will ensure that our initial evaluation is faxed over to them in order to maintain lines of communication and a complete medical record. We look forward to seeing you soon.

Has direct access to physical therapy benefited you or a friend? We would love to hear about your success stories. Leave a comment below, call us at 305-735-8901, or click here to schedule an appointment.

Learn How this Ancient form of Alternative Medicine Can Help You Heal Faster

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Heal Your Injuries Faster with the Ancient Form of Alternative Medicine known as Cupping Therapy

By Tim Alemi

Cupping Therapy originated in ancient Egyptian and Chinese medicine, however, it has since made its way into the world of western orthopedic medicine. It is commonly used today in orthopedic physical therapy for the treatment of pain, trigger points, and myofascial adhesions. Cupping therapy has seen a dramatic rise in popularity recently due to increased media exposure secondary to an increase in athletes and celebrities supporting this ancient form of alternative medicine. Cupping therapy describes the act of placing a plastic, glass, or bamboo “cups” onto the body to create negative pressure, or a vacuum, to pull the skin away from the affected area. Once the cup is placed on the skin, the “vacuum” is created by suctioning the air out from the cup. The underlying tissue is pulled away from the body, resulting in improved perfusion to the affected area. Cups can be fixed on one localized area or moving to drag cups across a larger area to create a skin-rolling, massage-like effect. Treatments typically last for about 5-15 minutes before cups are removed from the skin. Cupping therapy in the orthopedic physical therapy setting typically uses suction, but it is common in other professions to use fire as a modality to create a negative pressure vacuum. Prior to treatment, it is crucial to ensure that your patient is aware of circular bruising and mild discomfort that may occur as a side effect of this treatment.

Cupping Therapy Benefits

Cupping therapy in the orthopedic setting has contributed to beneficial outcomes for the reduction of pain. It helps to remove toxins, decreasing the presence of adhesions, mobilize subcutaneous connective tissue, stimulate the autonomic nervous system, and provide improved circulation to affected area. Regulation of the immune system and reduction of high blood pressure are two other benefits that have also been proposed as a result of this treatment. Cupping is an ideal alternative for patients who have soft-tissue dysfunction but do not tolerate palpation, soft-tissue mobilization, instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization, or cross-fiber massage.

Much of the research and evidence on cupping therapy is unreliable due to high risk of bias (84.44% of 135 RCTs)1. However, the results of a systematic review performed by Cao et al found that cupping may be an effective treatment for herpes zoster, acne, facial paralysis, and cervical spondylosis. An overview of systematic reviews performed by Lee et al suggests that cupping may be an effective alternative treatment for the reduction of pain.2 Cupping therapy is a good alternative to reduce pain in patients who cannot tolerate palpation or soft-tissue mobilization.

Patient Testimonial:

“ I was experiencing right hip pain that would increase each time I ran. Dr. Fox worked on my hip with manual therapy and cupping which reduced my symptoms 50% the first 2 visits”.

Have you used Cupping Therapy in the past? Tell us about your experience and tips you can share in the comments section below.

Why You Want Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization Therapy

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Heal Faster With Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization Therapy

By: Tim Alemi – Fox Physical Therapy

Patients experiencing soft-tissue dysfunction such as the formation of scar tissue, trigger points, or sprains/strains are often treated with manual therapy techniques such as Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM), manual soft-tissue mobilization, or many other types of massage techniques. These techniques are used to help stimulate the healing response, promote correct realignment of collagen fibers, and decrease pain. Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that utilizes specifically designed concave/convex tools to identify and breakdown myofascial restrictions, soft tissue fibrosis, scar tissue adhesions, and chronic inflammation, which should result in improved outcomes for both the patient and the physical therapist when compared to other manual therapy techniques. The shape of the tools allow for ease of use, swift and comfortable adjustment to contours of the body, minimal stress on the PT’s hands, and maximal penetration into soft tissue.

Patients that are typically treated with IASTM include those diagnosed with soft-tissue dysfunctions such as tendinopathies, ligament sprains, muscular strains, and scar tissue adhesions. Further examples of common injuries treated with this technique include Achilles tendinitis, plantar fasciitis, IT band syndrome, medial and lateral epicondylitis, cervical/lumbar sprains/strains, patellofemoral disorders, rotator cuff tendinosis, shin splints, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Further research needs to be completed to appropriately determine which pathologies are most effectively treated with IASTM.

The proposed mechanism of IASTM utilizes controlled microtrauma resulting in increased fibroblast production to the treatment area, stimulating an inflammatory response triggering the healing process of affected tissues. Also, this technique is believed to increase blood flow to the area, as well as facilitate the breakdown of cross-link adhesions found in collagen fibers of myofascial soft tissues and scar tissue. However, perhaps the greatest proposed advantages of IASTM is that the tool helps to protect the PT’s hands from injury, and provide the clinician with greater palpation skill to specifically identify an area that needs to be treated.

Although further research needs to be completed to determine if IASTM is truly any more beneficial than other manual therapy techniques, much of the evidence supports IASTM as an effective treatment to determine. Burke et al proposed that the primary benefit of IASTM over other manual therapy techniques may only be the decreased stress on the hands of the physical therapist2. However, according to Loghmani et al, injured ligaments treated with instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization were “43% stronger, 40% stiffer, and 57% more able to absorb energy” than the untreated contralateral injured side3.

The jury is still out if this is a more effective treatment than traditional manual therapy, IASTM continues to make a strong case to be greatly beneficial for both the patient and the clinician. In our clinic, we have seen great results with patients that have soft tissue restrictions. Within one treatment session patients are able to move better after use of IASTM. Some common areas we see great results with are low back, knee, neck, and ankle.

For more information on IASTM Therapy and to schedule your free consultation contact us at 305-735-8901 or click here.

AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill®

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Get Faster and Safer Results with the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill

Fox Physical Therapy in Miami, Florida is proud to announced the arrival of our newest rehabilitation technology, the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill, the world’s first and only treadmill using NASA based anti-gravity technology, has been installed to help patients in their short-term rehabilitation programs.

The AlterG treadmill will be a huge asset to our facility and our patients will benefit the most. Patient’s recovering from all lower extremity injuries, surgeries, and back pain will get relief with the Alter-G treadmill.

AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmills enable faster rehabilitation, safer conditioning for the geriatric population, and weight loss, which can help remove major obstacles associated with these activities. Impact on the body and the pain of recovery are reduced, which helps people achieve better results. Patients at Fox Physical Therapy can now rehab better, train smarter, and exercise safer with the AlterG.

With the AlterG, patients can run and walk without bearing their entire weight, reducing the impact on the body to optimize rehabilitation and physical therapy outcomes. Its Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology applies a lifting force to the body that reduces weight on the lower extremities and allows precise unweighting – up to 80% of a person’s body weight, so people can find exactly where the pain stops and natural movement feels good again.

There are a multitude of benefits when training and rehabilitating on the AlterG. Patients can use the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill to recover from injury and surgery and it allows them to immediately do partial weight bearing exercises. Patients with neurological disorders maintain, and in some cases even regain functionality and mobility working with the AlterG. It is also used as a motivational tool for obese patients, as users can immediately experience what it would feel like to weigh less, exercise with less joint impact and stress, and improve their cardiovascular health.

“With AlterG you get all the gain, without the pain,” says Steve Basta, CEO of AlterG. Adopted initially by nationally renowned hospitals and rehabilitation facilities, most recently nursing facilities are seeing the benefits the AlterG can provide for their patients. “We are pleased that Fox Physical Therapy is one of those pioneers,” he said. “Our unique approach to unweighted physical therapy preserves natural body movement, helps with fall prevention and benefits a broad range of medical conditions.”

AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmills are designed to be used for lower body injury and surgery rehabilitation, aerobic conditioning, weight control and reduction, sport specific conditioning programs, neurologic retraining, and geriatric strength and conditioning.

Contact us today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Fox and learn if the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill is right for your rehab. Call 305-735-8901 or click here.

Welcome To Our Website

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Fox Physical Therapy Miami

Thank you for stopping by our new website. We are excited to open our physical therapy office in Miami, Florida in January 2015. Join our mailing list to stay up to date with important news around the office and tips for improving your rehabilitation experience.

Fox Physical Therapy is a premier Orthopedic and Sports Injury Rehabilitation Center located in downtown Miami at the 25 Mirage Building inside Miami Performance Sports Institute, owned by licensed physical therapist Dr. Brett Fox PT, DPT,OCS, COMT.

Our modern Physical Therapy facility and outstanding team can provide the best environment for patient success. Combined with our hands-on, results-based approach, Fox Physical Therapy creates an enjoyable and motivating atmosphere to address a wide range of work, auto, orthopedic, and sports related injuries.

We look forward to working and serving the Miami community.

Fox PT –